PD Dr. Drewing

Serial integration and the control of exploratory movements in active touch A5

Planned research

Project A5 aims to investigate how humans control multi-segment natural explorations in active touch. In the first funding period we showed that an interplay of closed-loop sensorimotor processes and predictive open-loop processes determines the control of haptic exploratory movement, and that the serially gathered haptic information is integrated under conditions of memory decay and adaptation. In the second period, we will test and fine-tune our Kalman filter model of serial integration with regard to its predictions on perception and the control of exploratory movements, and with regard to extending it towards more naturalistic multisensory situations and knowledge-based perception. Finally, we will explore a role of low-level features for the guidance of haptic exploration. Our work is guided by the hypotheses that people make optimal use from the information available and fine-tune their exploratory movements in order to optimize the gathering of sensory information for perception, based on information that is yet available.

Current research

Project A5 aims to investigate how humans control multi-segment natural explorations in active touch. Using the example of softness and roughness, we will study how predictive and sensory signals about stimulus values affect exploratory movements, and  how these signals are integrated into a percept of the stimulus during the course of the exploration. Then, we will quantitatively model the control of natural explorations and start to evaluate the model. We expect that people fine-tune their exploratory movements in order to optimize perception and that predictive signals are used to increase the efficiency of this fine-tuning.

new project-related publications

  • Billino, J., & Drewing, K. (2018). Age effects on visuo-haptic length discrimination: Evidence for optimal integration of senses in senior adults. Multisensory Research, 31(3-4), 273-300. DOI find paper
  • Cellini, C., Scocchia, L., & Drewing, K. (2016). The buzz-lag effect. Experimental brain research, 10, 2849-2857. find paper
  • Drewing , K. (2018). The extent of skin bending rather than action possibilities explains why holes feel larger with the tongue than with the finger. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 44(4), 535. find paper
  • Drewing, K. (2018, June). Judged Roughness as a Function of Groove Frequency and Groove Width in 3D-Printed Gratings. In International Conference on Human Haptic Sensing and Touch Enabled Computer Applications (pp. 258-269). Springer, Cham. find paper
  • Drewing, K. (2016). Low-Amplitude Textures Explored with the Bare Finger: Roughness Judgments Follow an Inverted U-Shaped Function of Texture Period Modified by Texture Type. Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications (pp. 206-217). Springer: Heidelberg. DOI find paper
  • Drewing, K., Bruckbauer, S., & Szoke, D. (2015). Felt hole size depends on force and on the pliability of the effector. World Haptics Conference, 2015 IEEE (pp. 100-105). IEEE. find paper
  • Drewing, K., Hitzel, E., & Scocchia, L. (2018). The haptic and the visual flash-lag effect and the role of flash characteristics. PloS one, 13(1), e0189291. find paper
  • Drewing, K., Weyel, C., Celebi, H., & Kaya, D. (2016). Feeling and feelings: Affective and sensory dimensions of touched materials and their connection. World Haptics Conference, 2017 IEEE (pp. 25-30), IEEE. find paper
  • Drewing, K., Weyel, C., Celebi, H., & Kaya, D. (2018). Systematic relations between affective and sensory material dimensions in touch. IEEE Transactions on Haptics. find paper
  • Lezkan, A. & Drewing, K. (2016). Going against the grain – Texture orientation affects direction of exploratory movement. Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications (pp. 430-440). Springer: Heidelberg. DOI find paper
  • Lezkan, A. & Drewing, K. (2018). Processing of haptic texture information over sequential exploration movements. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 80(1), 177-192. find paper
  • Lezkan, A. & Drewing, K. (2014). Unequal - but fair? Weights in the serial integration of haptic texture information. Haptics: Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling, and Applications (pp. 386-392). Springer: Heidelberg. DOI find paper
  • Lezkan, A. Manuel, S.G. Colgate, J.E., Klatzky, R.L,. Peshkin, M.A. & Drewing, K. (2016). Multiple Fingers – One Gestalt. IEEE Transactions on Haptics 99. DOI find paper
  • Lezkan, A., & Drewing, K. (2015). Predictive and sensory signals systematically lower peak forces in the exploration of softer objects. World Haptics Conference, 2015 IEEE (pp. 69-74). IEEE. DOI find paper
  • Lezkan, A., & Drewing, K. (2018). Processing of haptic texture information over sequential exploration movements. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 80(1), 177-192. find paper
  • Lezkan, A., Drewing, K. (2018b). Interdependences between finger movement direction and haptic perception of oriented textures. PLoS ONE 13(12): e0208988.
  • Lezkan, A., Metzger, A., & Drewing, K. (2018). Active Haptic Exploration of Softness: Indentation Force is Systematically Related to Prediction, Sensation and Motivation. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 12, 59
  • Metzger, A. & Drewing, K. (2016). Haptic aftereffect of softness. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Haptics: Perception, Devices, Control, and Applications (pp. 23-32). Springer: Heidelberg. DOI find paper
  • Metzger, A., & Drewing, K. (2015). Haptically perceived softness of deformable stimuli can be manipulated by applying external forces during the exploration. World Haptics Conference, 2015 IEEE (pp. 75-81). IEEE.DOI find paper
  • Metzger, A., & Drewing, K. (2019). Effects of Stimulus Exploration Length and Time on the Integration of Information in Haptic Softness Discrimination. IEEE transactions on haptics. find paper
  • Metzger, A., Drewing, K. (2017). The longer the first stimulus is explored in softness discrimination the longer it can be compared to the second one. Worldhaptics Conference 2017, IEEE, in press. DOI find paper
  • Metzger, A., Lezkan, A., & Drewing, K. (2018). Integration of serial sensory information in haptic perception of softness. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 44(4), 551. DOI find paper
  • Metzger, A., Mueller, S., Fiehler, K., & Drewing, K. (2019). Top-down modulation of shape and roughness discrimination in active touch by covert attention. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 81(2), 462-475. find paper
  • Metzger, A., Toscani, M., Valsecchi, M., & Drewing, K. (2018, June). Haptic Saliency Model for Rigid Textured Surfaces. In International Conference on Human Haptic Sensing and Touch Enabled Computer Applications (pp. 389-400). Springer, Cham.
  • Wolf, C., Tiest, W. M. B., & Drewing, K. (2018). A mass-density model can account for the size-weight illusion. PloS one, 13(2), e0190624. find paper
  • Zoeller, A. C., Lezkan, A., Paulun, V. C., Fleming, R. W., & Drewing, K. (2019). Integration of prior knowledge during haptic exploration depends on information type. Journal of vision, 19(4), 20-20. find paper
  • Zöller, A. C., Lezkan, A., Paulun, V. C., Fleming, R. W., & Drewing, K. (2018, June). Influence of Different Types of Prior Knowledge on Haptic Exploration of Soft Objects. In International Conference on Human Haptic Sensing and Touch Enabled Computer Applications (pp. 413-424). Springer, Cham. find paper

former project-related publications

  • Drewing, K. (2008). Shape Discrimination in Active Touch: Effects of Exploratory Direction and Their Exploitation. In M. Ferre (Ed.) Haptics: Perception, Devices and Scenarios. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 5024 (pp. 219-228). Springer: Heidelberg.
  • Drewing, K. (2012). After experience with the task humans actively optimize shape discrimination in touch by utilizing effects of exploratory movement direction. Acta Psychologica 141, 295-303.
  • Drewing, K. & Aschersleben G. (2003). Reduced timing variability during bimanual coupling: a role for sensory information. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. A 66(2), 329-350.
  • Drewing, K. & Ernst, M. O. (2006). Integration of force and position cues for shape perception through active touch. Brain Research, 1078, 92-100.
  • Drewing, K. & Kaim, L. (2009). Haptic Shape Perception from Force and Position Signals Varies with Exploratory Movement Direction and the Exploring Finger. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics 71(5), 1174-1184.
  • Drewing, K., Lezkan, A., & Ludwig, S. (2011). Texture Discrimination in Active Touch: Effects of the Extension of the Exploration and their Exploitation. In C. Basodogan, S. Choi, M. Harders, L. Jones, & Y. Yokokohji (Eds.) Conference Proceedings – IEEE World Haptics Conference 2011 (pp. 215-220), The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Catalog Number CFP11365-USB.
  • Kaim, L. & Drewing, K. (2010). Exploratory pressure influences haptic shape perception via force signals. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics 72, 823-38.
  • Kaim, L. & Drewing, K. (2011). Exploratory strategies in haptic softness discrimination are tuned to achieve high levels of task performance. IEEE Transactions on Haptics 4. 242-252.